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Producing any type of dive equipment, including wetsuits, will have a negative impact on the environment in some way

So when it came to designing our first Apeks wetsuit, it was vitally important that where possible, we found better ways of doing things, such as using materials that are kinder to our environment

Why Limestone

neoprene?

The main neoprene compound used in most wetsuits is chloroprene. Traditionally, an oil derivative called butadine was used to bind the chloroprene together. Instead of using this dirty petroleum-based ingredient, we use calcium carbonate derived from limestone to bind the chloroprene and form chloroprene rubber chips. These rubber chips are melted down and infused with air bubbles. This is then baked into a block of limestone neoprene foam which we can cut to the thickness we need. In the case of the ThermiQ 8/7, that is 8mm for the torso and 7mm for the legs and arms (hence the name 8/7!)

Not only is limestone neoprene a kinder solution for our planet, it also creates A superior product.

The durability, flexibility and insulation characteristics of limestone neoprene are better than its petroleum based neoprene predecessor. This makes limestone neoprene one of the most flexible and warm neoprene types out there.

Any off-cuts of neoprene that are created during the production of the ThermiQ 8/7 are recovered and reused to make other products. Around 5,000 kilogrammes of neoprene is reborn every year, minimising the waste that goes to landfill.

Carbon Black

Never heard of carbon black?

Well neither had we until we started looking at how to make our wetsuit in an environmentally sensitive way.

Carbon black is an additive that makes neoprene durable and stabilises the material to help keep your suit looking good for longer. BUT. Carbon Black is not a nice product, it’s made by burning oils or gases at very high temperatures.

To make our suit kinder to the environment, our Carbon Black is made from recycled car tyres, using a process called tyre pyrolysis. By reusing existing waste material like old car tyres, we can significantly reduce energy consumption and reduce CO2 emissions by 200g per wetsuit.

That’s a massive 72% reduction in CO2 emissions compared to using traditional Carbon Black!

Neoprene

lining

Each neoprene panel on the ThermiQ 8/7 has a smooth, soft laminated lining which is made with yarns made from recycled plastic bottles. Polyester yarn recovered from 45 plastic bottles goes into each wetsuit.

WATER RESISTANT SEAMS

Our wetsuit seams are first glued and then stitched to provide maximum water resistance, comfort and durability.

Neoprene Lining

Each neoprene panel on the ThermiQ 8/7 has a smooth, soft laminated lining which is made with yarns made from recycled plastic bottles. Polyester yarn recovered from 45 plastic bottles goes into each wetsuit.

WATER BASED GLUE

Unlike traditional wetsuits that use a solvent-based glue during the neoprene lamination process, we use a solvent-free and completely water-based glue called Aqua-Alpha. This removes the use of a massive 600g of volatile organic compounds per suit.

Better for the environment and the people making the wetsuits.

Water

Based Glue

Unlike traditional wetsuits that use a solvent-based glue during the neoprene lamination process, we use a solvent-free and completely water-based glue called Aqua-Alpha.

This removes the use of a massive 600g of volatile organic compounds per suit.

Better for the environment and the people making the wetsuits.

DOPE-DYE

YARN

The dope-dying process infuses dye pigments into a molten plastic solution to produce coloured yarns without using the traditional dying process. This saves tremendous amounts of water, 104 litres per kilogramme of fabric.

reduces energy consumption and CO2 emissions by 26% per kilogram of fabric.

DOPE-DYE YARN

The dope-dying process infuses dye pigments into a molten plastic solution to produce coloured yarns without using the traditional dying process. This saves tremendous amounts of water, 104 litres per kilogramme of fabric.

reduces energy consumption and CO2 emissions by 26% per kilogram of fabric.

Solar-power

Like many of our Apeks products, the factory that produces our wetsuits is solar-powered. The roof-top solar array generates over 6 million kWh of energy each year.

reducing CO2 emissions by over 7 million kilograms annually!